Sleep 911 with The Baby Sleep Whisperer – session 1

baby sleep tipsSleep is so incredibly important for our children’s emotional and physical development. Ingrid Prueher, The Baby Sleep Whisperer and the Woombie’s Resident Child Sleep Expert, knows the importance of sleep because of her personal experience of being a mom of two and because of the many families she has helped achieve sleep bliss. Ingrid is making it her mission to empower as many sleepless parents as possible so they can teach their little ones how to become healthy sleepers. Here are the new Sleep 911 Q&A we received:

QUESTION:

Ive been swaddling my 5 month old since day 1. I just moved him to the crib because he was pressing his face up against the fabric in the bassinet. He seems to sleep better if he has his face on something, so he sometimes rolls onto his belly. It I. Afraid that being swaddled he might not be able to adjust himself. He’s still waking every 2 hours too… I’d love to get some sleep! Any advice would be great.

Thanks!

Megan, Indiana

ANSWER:

Hi Megan,

Thank you for sending in your sleep question. I agree that it was time to move him into the crib; make sure not to have the following items in the crib: bumpers, blankets or stuffed animals that can restrict his breathing. If he is turning over already then he should no longer be swaddled. Swaddling is not recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics for infants who are capable of turning over for fear of restriction to their air passage ways. In regards to getting him to sleep longer, providing there are no medical issues, like reflux, weight issues, etc., one thing you should focus on is getting him down at the right biological sleep times for naps and bedtime. Bedtime is especially important because it sets the tone as to how naps will go the next day. If he doesn’t sleep well all day then he should have a very early bedtime. You also want to make sure that his sleep environment is conducive to promoting sleep. You want a quiet routine before sleep time, ideally no TV or playing at least an hour before he needs to go to sleep. Instead read books, give a bath, if it doesn’t stimulate him, sing songs, etc.

I will also send you an email with this information.

Warm Regards,
Ingrid Prueher, The Baby Sleep Whisperer

QUESTION:

My almost 7 month old daughter USED TO sleep thru the night. At around 5 months, she started waking up to nurse and suckle. I thought when she got on foods at 6 months she would start sleeping thru the night again but that is not happening. I think it is mostly comfort seeking but I am not sure what I should do. I am not a stay at home mom and really can’t (don’t want to) stay up all night. I try to let her cry some but not for very long (MAYBE 5 minutes) because it wakes my 2 year old. Any suggestions?

Jennifer, New York

ANSWER:

Hi Jenifer,

Thank you for sending your sleep question. Given she is use to nursing at night, I advise to continue feeding her but instead of nursing provide the feed via a bottle. Reason being, it will allow her to get a feed by either you or your significant other 😉 and it will make the process of weaning her much faster.  The absence of the nursing will also help break the association of needing the nursing to soothe back to sleep. Begin by decreasing the amount of the bottle feed by 1/2 an ounce every second night. Notice how much she is drinks on the first night. If you give her a 6 oz bottle on the first night but she only drinks 3 oz, then the next night only offer her 3 oz to start off with. If she drinks 6 oz’s on the first night then you will want to give her 1/2 an ounce less the next night for two nights and then decrease it again by 1/2 ounce and so on and so forth until she no longer needs a feeding. In the meantime, try to increase her milk intake during the day by the 1/2 ounce you are decreasing at night. Before starting the weaning process, please make sure that your pediatrician confirms that her weight is where it’s supposed to be and that he has given the okay of not providing a feeding through the night.

I will also send you an email with this information.

Warm Regards,
Ingrid Prueher, The Baby Sleep Whisperer

 

Thank you to all those who submitted a question and if you need additional help with your situation and you would like to join the many happy and rested parents I have helped, please email at sleepconsultant@woombie.com so I can provide you with my sleep consulting package options.

 

The Baby Sleep WhispererSleep 911 Q&A by Ingrid Prueher, The Baby Sleep Whisperer and Woombie’s Resident Child Sleep Expert

Ingrid Prueher is the founder of The Baby Sleep Whisperer (after affectionately being named that by her clients), a child sleep consulting service that helps lessen expecting and new parents stress and empowers them so they can teach their babies how to become amazing sleepers. Ingrid is a certified Family Sleep Institute Child Sleep Consultant, Certified Stress Management Coach, Certified educator for Dunstan Baby Language, Certified educator for Happiest Baby on the Block, a Certified Newborn Care Specialist and a Parenting Educator. She is also the founder of Parent Prep Classes.

Ingrid resides in Fairfield, CT with her husband and two boys. She runs a private practice where she meets with parents one-on-one and over the phone. Ingrid is a sought-after expert and has been featured in US News and World Report, NY Daily News, Hartford Courant, Examiner.com, New York Family magazine, Fox CT, The Better Connecticut show and Australia’s Triple M -The Cage Radio Show.  Ingrid is a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, National Sleep Foundation, American Sleep Association and The International Stress Management Association (UK).

Have a sleep question to ask The Baby Sleep Whisperer?  Submit your child sleep questions here and tune in on Tuesdays from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. and Thursdays from 7:30 – 8:30 p.m. each week.

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